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Brand Failures

The Truth About the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

Examine 100 of the world's most spectacular brand disasters, including Enron, Pan Am, smokeless cigarettes and Bic underwear, and learn valuable lessons to ensure a healthy existence for your brand.
    Paperback£19.99
    Ebook£16.66
    Print and ebook bundle£25.00
EAN: 9780749462994
Edition: 2
Published:
Paperback
Format: 217x139
256 pages
    About the book
    Table of contents
    Reviews

About the book

What do Coca-Cola, McDonald's, IBM, Microsoft and Virgin all have in common? Yes, they are all global giants, but what they are less recognized for are the many branded products they have launched which bombed spectacularly - and at great cost.

Brand Failures takes a riveting look at how such disasters occur. This new edition of Matt Haig's best-selling book, provides the inside-story of 100 major brand blunders that make for jaw-dropping reading. Brand Failures explores the brands that have set sail with the help of multi-million dollar advertising campaigns only to sink without a trace. From acknowledged brand mistakes made by successful blue-chip companies to some lesser know but hilarious bomb-shells, it reveals what went wrong in every case and provides a valuable checklist of lessons learnt for each.

A tour of this fascinating hall of failure will alert you to potential dangers and show you how to ensure a long, healthy life for your brand.

About the authors

Matt Haig

Matt Haig is an independent consultant advising organisations of all types and sizes on creating integrated marketing and branding solutions. As one of the very first writers on e-business, Matt has always been at the forefront of developing leading edge marketing solutions. More recently he has carried out mobile marketing consultancy for several companies and has researched and written extensively on the subject.

More about Matt Haig

An entertaining and useful read. As a ready crib for the most famous brand foul-ups, this book is hard to beat.

The Financial Times