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How People Learn

A New Model of Learning and Cognition to Improve Performance and Education

Design training and educational programmes to improve learning, engagement and skills development for office based and remote workers.
EAN: 9781398607194
Edition: 2
Published:
Format: 234x156
264 pages

About the book

How can I design training so that it makes a real difference to employees' skills and development? This book gives L&D professionals everything they need to build effective learning experiences.

How People Learn
provides L&D professionals a new way of thinking about learning by exploring what happens when we learn. It shows how to apply insights from neuroscience, human behaviour and artificial intelligence (AI) to learning design including tips on how to interest, excite and engage staff in training. Using the author's '5Di model', this book demonstrates how to define, design and deploy training into existing workflows so it works both for and with employees. It also explores how simulations can be used to replicate a real-world challenge as closely as possible.

The second edition features new material on learning in a hybrid world, and how to manage skills development and performance now that work, workplaces and workers have changed. It includes more practical guidance on building programmes with user-centred design and covers developments in the connection between learning and cognition, alongside case studies and examples from companies such as BP and the BBC.

About the authors

Nick Shackleton-Jones is HR Director, Talent & Learning at Deloitte, UK. His work focuses on building a better experience for employees and improving organizational performance. He was previously the Director of Learning and Performance Innovation at PA Consulting Group and Director of Learning Innovation and Technology at BP. He has also held senior roles in L&D at Siemens Communications and the BBC. Based in Reading, UK, in 2017, he is a previous award winner of the Colin Corder award by the Learning and Performance Institute for services to the learning industry.